The Interstitial Park

The Interstitial Park project focused on the development of a mediating topography that integrated parking, amphitheaters, and a pedestrian landscape into a site between two urban conditions. The site was defined by a major elevational change between the two urban conditions, such that the resulting topography had to deal with sectional as well as planar changes.

The project was envisioned as a series of ruled surfaces that were controlled by the manipulation of regulating lines in order to yield a topography that incorporated all of the programmatic requirements into a fluid surface.

During the first phase of the design the focus was on the use of a grid to develop a singular surface that had significant sectional changes. From the development of that surface, several test where carried out to extract information from the surface that could lead to the development of interior and exterior volumes. Tests included the creation of topography from the surface, the pixelization of the surface, and the development of sectional stratification from the surface.

A modification of the last test, sectional stratification, became the impetus for the remainder of the project. Rather than creating a surface and then dividing it sectionally through a series of regulating lines, the project became about the manipulation of regulating lines in order to produce a ruled surface.

If the first three sets of iterations could be seen as a series of discovered objects that began to suggest the location of specific programs, the final iteration was the result of the analysis of sections taken from those iterations to maximize the programmatic potential. The final iteration focused on the development of cohesive amphitheaters as well as multiple pedestrian pathways.

Several manipulations were made to reduce the amount of poache space created in the previous schemes. At the same time, there was an attempt made at dissolving the regulating lines at points of tangency such that the planes created would, at points, flow into each other. The result was a series of smaller surfaces that negotiated between the different programs but came together at various points to create larger surfaces.

john Cool! I really like how you brought it out of the ground using the topography to dictate some of the usage. Like the last model also. Is that printed?
Hopefully at some point I can see the project up close.

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