Architecture for Qalqilya

Here is a story, one of many, of Qalqilya.

 

Sometimes you start a project with a really clear idea of were you want it to go and then you do everything possible to get there. Sometimes you start a project without any idea of where you want it to go and just ride along. And sometimes, you start a project with a really clear idea only to find out that the project refuses to let you dictate where it goes. In the latter case you must decide what to do, whether to fight the project or let it lead you.  But it’s hard to let go of what you had imagined.

So it was with this thesis. It seemed so clear what I needed to do when I got started, only to find out two thirds of the way that it wasn’t possible. And it was hard to accept that a new direction was necessary. Yet letting go could not have been more rewarding. It allowed the project to be what it needed to be and it took me down a path I could not have expected. But I’m glad that I let it take its own course.

For the final presentation, I just showed the movie and the props that were used to make it, but here you can find the entire book. It was an interesting and incredible review. Perhaps not the kind of discussion that I had hoped, but it was good to challenge the critics to find the role of architecture in the project. And to ask the bigger question, what can we do as designers or architects in a place like Qalqilya?

For Christmas, we received the Jerusalem Cookbook, a very fitting gift to capstone my year of thinking about the region. The recipes in it are delicious and they showcase the diversity and richness that is perhaps what is best about the place. So here is a recipe for fattoush, one of the traditional salads of both Israelis and Palestinians.

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*

There was an error submitting your comment. Please try again.

S E A R C H
F A C E B O O K
I N S T A G R A M
S U S C R I B E